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OWNER'S NAME

 

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James Sweet

 

John Wirtz

 

Jeff Hendrix

 

Mohammad Karimi

 

Jeff Matthews

 

CABINET SERIAL NUMBER

 

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UR00102

 

UR00109

 

UR00113

 

UR00123

 

UR00126

 

 

Steve MacDonald

 

Jon Koolpe

 

Dale Johnson

 

Brett Pulliam

 

Dick Millikan

 

Jeff Civitate

 

Gary Royer

 

Mark Davidson

 

 Danny Miller

 

Rodney Minch

 

Francis Mariani

 

Archer Maclean

 

Alan Estenson

 

Chris Connolly

 

Michael Kelley

 

 

 

UR00140

 

UR00148

 

UR00151

 

UR00153

 

UR00176

 

UR00193

 

UR00234

 

UR00246

 

UR00309

 

UR00311

 

UR00341

 

UR00344

 

UR00350

 

UR00372

 

UR00396

 

 

Gary Vitagliano

 

Tom Szymanski

 

Matthew Sell

 

James Marous

 

Adam Greenbaum

 

Jay Gallagher

 

David Fish

 

Funspot - Weirs, NH

 

Mark Spaeth

 

James Hagen

 

Stephen Hertz

 

J. Anderson (Videotopia)

 

Richard Ford

 

Bill Esquivel

 

Todd Ellering

 

Oliver Moazzezi

 

Panos Koutsoyannis

 

Scott Evans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*no serial number

UR00405

 

UR00407

 

UR00424

 

UR00426

 

UR00445

 

UR00456

 

UR00461

 

UR00466

 

UR00502

 

UR00520

 

UR00521

 

UR00524

 

UR00546

 

UR00552

 

UR00563

 

UR00570

 

pre-production model*

 

pre-production model*

 

OVERVIEW:

Quantum is a vertically orientated color vector (X-Y) game, made by Atari in 1982.  When Quantum was released, it had a lot of things about it that had never existed previously.  For starters, it was the first game ever to feature filled color vector graphics and it was also the first that let you actually try the game out without inserting a coin (on one of the attract mode screens you are able to move the sparkler around and try to capture an atom).

It was also the first ever game to let the person who logged the highest score actually "sign" their name using the trackball in addition to entering their initials into the high score table.  Quantum was also Atari's first game (and their only vector game) that they used the Motorola 68000 16-bit CPU with.

Quantum was originally designed by General Computing Corporation, who had infringed on Atari's copyright of Missile Command when they made "Super Missile Attack".  Atari sued, and won, and as part of the settlement General Computing Corp. was mandated to develop 3 games for Atari.  Those 3 games were Quantum, Food Fight, and Nightmare (Nightmare was never released).

It's believed that less than 500 Quantums were made in spite of the fact that some people have Quantums that have serial numbers that are greater than 500.  This is possible because Atari often used non-sequential serial numbers with some of their releases in order hide the true production numbers. 

Quantum was only manufactured as a dedicated upright cabinet.  There were no cocktail, cabaret or cockpit versions ever made.  Additionally, there are two known pre-production models, and prototype (a.k.a. 'sample') artwork was used to make their side art, front art, and control panel overlays.  You can see several pictures of both of the pre-production models, as well as compare how the prototype artwork differs from the production artwork by clicking on this link: QUANTUM ARTWORK COMPARISON.

GAMEPLAY:

Quantum is a one-player or two-player (not simultaneous) game. The game action takes place in a sub-atomic world.  The player tries to capture deadly atomic particles without being destroyed by them.  To capture the particles, the player uses a trackball to control a sparkling comet.  The comet leaves a line-trail behind it.  The player must draw a complete circle around the deadly particle to destroy it, but without touching the particle, and before the comet's trail decays (i.e. disappears).

When a player captures a particle, it explodes and the point value appears on the screen.  If a player captures more than one particle at a time, double points are earned.  The player advances to a new level when all of the NUCLEI have been captured, even if there are other particles are still on the screen.  The comet is destroyed when it hits a particle or the red bonds between nuclei.  The game ends when all the player's comets are destroyed.

Players can select their beginning level (either 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9) and receive bonus points if that level is finished (this method was utilized in other Atari titles such as Tempest).  After a player's game ends, the game can be continued starting at the highest ODD-numbered level that they have finished.

Game play becomes more difficult as more and new particles appear and move faster.  Also, the player's comet grows bigger and bigger as the level progresses, making it much harder to maneuver without running into any particles.

PARTICLES:

PARTICLE NAME DESCRIPTION POINT VALUE
ELECTRON ROTATES SLOWLY AROUND A NUCLEUS.  THERE WILL BE VARYING AMOUNTS OF ELECTRONS SURROUNDING EACH NUCLEUS. 20
SPLITTER TRAVELS IN A RANDOM PATTERN, FLASHES COLOR AND THEN SPLITS INTO 3. 100
TRIPHON MOVES SLOWLY AND FLASHES COLORS. 100
PHOTON ENTERS INTO THE PLAYFIELD FROM ONE SIDE OF THE SCREEN AND THEN EXITS OUT OF THE OPPOSITE SIDE. 200
POSITRON MADE UP OF STRAY ELECTRONS AFTER A NUCLEUS IS DESTROYED. MOVES OFF THE SCREEN QUICKLY. 200
NUCLEUS MOVES SLOWLY AND BOUNCES OFF THE EDGE OF THE PLAYFIELD.  CUTS OFF THE END OF THE COMET'S TRAIL WHEN IT CROSSES IT.  AT THE HIGHER LEVELS, NUCLEI ARE JOINED BY A BOND WHICH ROUTINELY ALTERNATES BETWEEN BLUE AND RED (WHEN IT'S RED IT CAN'T BE CROSSED). 300
TRYD LEFT IN THE WAKE OF A TRIPHON, THEN SLOWLY SHRINKS AND DISAPPEARS. 300
PULSAR ATTRACTS TOWARDS THE COMET AND EXPANDS AND CONTRACTS LOOPING PULSE LINES AS IT MOVES. 400

 

Additional information can be found at GameArchive and KLOV.

 

FLYER*:|FRONT|

FLYER*:|BACK|

PRINT*: |MANUAL| - |SUPPLEMENT| - |SCHEMATICS| - |BULLETIN|

*Flyer images and print courtesy The Arcade Flyer Archive & ARCade ARChive respectively.

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Copyright 2004-2010 Francis Mariani. All rights reserved.